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Often, in the media and within communities, sexual assault victims/survivors are portrayed as “broken.” People expect a survivor’s post-assault world to have sharp edges: we are expected to exist only as shattered pieces of a former self; we are expected to be afraid of the world, afraid of intimacy, afraid of everything.

What’s often excluded from these narratives is the strength a survivor can find after being assaulted. I chose to feature some positive experiences survivors have had as a way to showcase some positive points in some healing journeys. Every survivor’s process is different; some may feel they need no healing at all, while others may endure a long healing process before regaining normalcy.

We must also recognize that the survivors featured here (and others who are out there) are privileged enough to have the resources to heal - whether that’s in the form of supportive partners, counselors, family members, administrators, etc. Every survivor deserves these resources and more, and not all have access to them.

Here’s to surviving, on whatever path you choose.

7 months ago / 82 notes
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Boston Globe feature

Since [its launch], ‘Surviving in Numbers’ has received more than 250 anonymous poster submissions. Safran has worked with students at Boston University, Tufts University, and Mount Holyoke College, displaying the signs on campus and offering time and supplies for victims to make one of their own.

Safran said she hopes the Obama administration will elicit survivor input in addressing the prevalence of sexual assaults. ‘It’s a great step,’ she said, of the initiative. ‘And college campuses are a great place to start.’”

Read more here!

7 months ago / 6 notes
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7 months ago / 38 notes
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Stalking Awareness Month

Did you know January is nationally recognized as Stalking Awareness Month? The US Department of Justice defines stalking as “a pattern of repeated and unwanted attention, harassment, contact, or any other course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to feel fear.”

Stalking often occurs in the context of an intimate partner violence and/or sexual assault situation. The majority of survivors who are stalked by current or former partners report having been physically assaulted by these partners, and 1/3 also report having been sexually assaulted by those partners.

Survivors of stalking often experience significant fear and safety concerns, as well as symptoms of depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder.

To learn more, visit http://stalkingawarenessmonth.org/about .

7 months ago / 57 notes
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Whether you’re a survivor, a significant other of a survivor, or a reader of Surviving in Numbers, thanks for a fantastic first 8 months online. Your bravery and willingness to share your stories (and/or be open to the stories of others) is making the world a safer, more supportive place for survivors of sexual and domestic violence.

Have a happy and safe start to the new year!

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